Last night (Sat July 17th), we have severe storms that were wide-spread over so much of the state yesterday & last night. I know there were straight-line winds and I heard on the news there were 11 unconfirmed tornado touchdowns.

I live in Elk River, MN (Zone 4); this is my first garden and I have no idea how to fix the damage! I know that a lot of you are probably busy with your own gardens and families today, but if anyone has the time, could you provide any tips for me? I am going to take pictures of the damage in hopes someone can help me save my plants.

I volunteered at The Crossing Church last night and they stopped the 2nd service so we could take shelter. There was a wall cloud right on top of us trying to drop a funnel! My husband was at home with the dogs in the basement. When it was safe, I came home, but it was too dark to see all the damage, much less take any pictures.

I don't mean to sound like a frantic garden psycho, but this is my very first garden and I planted it with the full intention of providing almost all of it to the First Fruits fresh food distribution at Central Lutheran Church. The food shelves here have kept us fed for over a year and although I still receive food from them every week, it's important for me to be able to give back in thanks!

Thank you all for any help in advance! Also, please forgive any duplicity, but I am posting this in more than one group so I can get as much help as possible.

Thank you so much for taking the time to read my post. Take care!
Jolene

Tags: damage, plants, repair, storm, stress, stressed, tomato

Views: 295

Replies to This Discussion

Just prop them up as best as you can and pack the soil at their base. Or stake the ones that have blown over. If they are severed or pulled out by the wind there isn't much hope but you can try to plant them in a hole if there is a root mass left.
Jolene, it depends on what type of damage you sustained.

Hail damage: Ripped leaves, broken stems

Wind: Knockdowns of corn or beans or tomatoes

Flooding?

I'm in northern Wisc. While we missed the horrific storms you met with, I did have only minor wind damage to my corn. What I did there was to anchor a post/metal rod at each end of the row (I have short rows under 12 feet). Then I used bailing twine (anything else organic) to tie on one end, weave it in and out of each plant in one direction, loop around the other post and weave in and out the other side of the plant. I located the twine about 30" from the ground. I figure this will give the plant stability without strangling the stalk. We had storms again last night w/heavy rain and they have held up fine since past mid week.

Make sure if you have garden debris, clean up the ground to avoid decay and attraction to bugs/slugs.

I did have a couple tomatoes split on me but only one row of them so I utilized the same method above to support them. It was tougher to do for the tomatoes but after last years 'no tomato summer', I want every plant to produce that I can.

Good luck to you.
With some TLC New stakes.... Cages if you had them in use... be sure to use a long 6-8 ft bamboo pole
2 feet in the ground.... secure each cage to.... Medium to large tomato's will rip down most cages during heavy storms.... Plant and plan ahead each season... to avoid severe damage ....

I cover my garden with row covers ..... and metal hoops to hold them up.... Save my garden from hail damage 3 weeks ago......

Chris John said:
Jolene, it depends on what type of damage you sustained.

Hail damage: Ripped leaves, broken stems

Wind: Knockdowns of corn or beans or tomatoes

Flooding?

I'm in northern Wisc. While we missed the horrific storms you met with, I did have only minor wind damage to my corn. What I did there was to anchor a post/metal rod at each end of the row (I have short rows under 12 feet). Then I used bailing twine (anything else organic) to tie on one end, weave it in and out of each plant in one direction, loop around the other post and weave in and out the other side of the plant. I located the twine about 30" from the ground. I figure this will give the plant stability without strangling the stalk. We had storms again last night w/heavy rain and they have held up fine since past mid week.

Make sure if you have garden debris, clean up the ground to avoid decay and attraction to bugs/slugs.

I did have a couple tomatoes split on me but only one row of them so I utilized the same method above to support them. It was tougher to do for the tomatoes but after last years 'no tomato summer', I want every plant to produce that I can.

Good luck to you.
Thank you all so much for all your help! I was lucky; the plants tipped, but the stalks didn't snap! :D :D :D Some of the leaves broke and a few of the fruits dropped, but not too many. I cleaned up all the debris & checked all the cages and secured them better. One was real top heavy - the Tami G grape tomato is about 6 ft tall with three main branches a lot of fruit. I used garden staples on all four corners of the base & stabilized the top so it won't tip again. Again - THANKS AND BLESSINGS TO YOU ALL!!! :D Jolene

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